What is the correct dose?

There is no one size fits all dose with CBD. It is dependent on a number of factors including:

  • The concentration of CBD
  • The weight of the individual
  • The individual’s body chemistry
  • The severity of the condition being treated

Check out our page on CBD dosing for more guidelines

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  1. I am not sure how to use your products. Do you have any general guidelines as to how to get the most benefit from your products? How to use it. what to use it for. How much to use.

    1. Be sure to look for products made with full or broad-spectrum oil — rather than distillate or isolate — to get the full scope of health benefits. Full-spectrum oils contain all cannabinoids in the cannabis plant, including both CBD and THC. Broad-spectrum oils contain most cannabinoids, but generally don’t contain THC.
      Research has found that THC and CBD may work better when taken together than they do when taken alone. This is referred to as the “entourage effect.”
      Full and broad-spectrum products are also less processed, which helps preserve some of cannabis’s volatile organic compounds, like terpenes. Terpenes affect the taste and smell of the product, and they have medical benefits of their own.
      Lab-tested
      Since CBD products aren’t currently regulated by the FDA, it’s important to ensure whatever you’re buying has been lab-tested by a third party. This will allow you to see exactly what you’re putting into your body, and verify that the product contains what the packaging says it does.
      U.S.-grown
      Look for products made from U.S.-grown cannabis. Cannabis grown in the United States is subject to agricultural regulations and can’t contain more than 0.3 percent THC.
      Edibles
      Edibles are a great and discreet way to try CBD. You can find a variety of CBD edibles including gummies, truffles, or even mints that do a great job of masking any “weedy” taste.
      There are a few caveats with edibles, however. Research shows that eating CBD subjects it to something called the “first pass effect.” During the first pass effect, CBD is partially broken down by the liver and digestive tract. This means that the CBD can take up to two hours to kick in, and you’ll absorb about 20 to 30 percent of it. Edibles take up to two hours to kick in, and you’ll absorb about 20 to 30 percent of the CBD you consume.
      Sublingual products
      Many edibles contain sugar and preservatives, so if you want to avoid additives, you might want to try a sublingual product. These are designed to be absorbed under your tongue. They include tinctures — solutions made by soaking cannabis flower in oil or alcohol — sprays, oils, and lozenges.
      Letting the product absorb under your tongue rather than subjecting it to the digestive tract preserves more of the CBD, and you’ll feel results faster.
      Sublingual products take effect faster than edible products. Choose this route if you’re looking for quicker results.
      Topicals
      CBD topicals are designed to be applied directly to the skin. You can find CBD-infused lotions, balms, creams, salves, and transdermal patches. Topicals are a great choice when it comes to treating localized pain or skin conditions like eczema in a discreet fashion. A 2015 study done on rats found that CBD gel applied to the skin greatly reduced joint swelling — promising results for people with conditions like arthritis.
      While studies on topicals haven’t given an estimate of bioavailability, we do know a couple of things:
      Topicals aren’t subjected to the first-pass effect, so they’ll provide concentrated relief to a particular area.
      The permeability of your skin is pretty poor relative to mucous membranes, like sublingual tissue. That means when using a topical product, you’ll want to choose one with a high amount of CBD and apply it generously.
      Using a product that contains additional analgesics including menthol, camphor and capsaicin may bring even more therapeutic potential to the mix.
      Vaping and Smoking
      You can smoke high-CBD cannabis flower in a joint, use a vaporizer with a cartridge that contains CBD oil, or even inhale CBD concentrates such as sugar waxes with any vape pen that has a chamber for concentrates.
      Vaping and smoking allow the CBD to go directly into your bloodstream, so you’ll feel effects much faster than you will with other methods. In 10 minutes or less, you’ll absorb 34 to 56 percent of the CBD. Vaped or smoked CBD takes effect in 10 minutes or less, and you’ll absorb about 34 to 56 percent of the CBD you consume. However, vaping may cause other negative health effects.

      1. Be sure to look for products made with full or broad-spectrum oil — rather than distillate or isolate — to get the full scope of health benefits. Full-spectrum oils contain all cannabinoids in the cannabis plant, including both CBD and THC. Broad-spectrum oils contain most cannabinoids, but generally don’t contain THC.
        Research has found that THC and CBD may work better when taken together than they do when taken alone. This is referred to as the “entourage effect.”
        Full and broad-spectrum products are also less processed, which helps preserve some of cannabis’s volatile organic compounds, like terpenes. Terpenes affect the taste and smell of the product, and they have medical benefits of their own.
        Lab-tested
        Since CBD products aren’t currently regulated by the FDA, it’s important to ensure whatever you’re buying has been lab-tested by a third party. This will allow you to see exactly what you’re putting into your body, and verify that the product contains what the packaging says it does.
        U.S.-grown
        Look for products made from U.S.-grown cannabis. Cannabis grown in the United States is subject to agricultural regulations and can’t contain more than 0.3 percent THC.
        Edibles
        Edibles are a great and discreet way to try CBD. You can find a variety of CBD edibles including gummies, truffles, or even mints that do a great job of masking any “weedy” taste.
        There are a few caveats with edibles, however. Research shows that eating CBD subjects it to something called the “first pass effect.” During the first pass effect, CBD is partially broken down by the liver and digestive tract. This means that the CBD can take up to two hours to kick in, and you’ll absorb about 20 to 30 percent of it. Edibles take up to two hours to kick in, and you’ll absorb about 20 to 30 percent of the CBD you consume.
        Sublingual products
        Many edibles contain sugar and preservatives, so if you want to avoid additives, you might want to try a sublingual product. These are designed to be absorbed under your tongue. They include tinctures — solutions made by soaking cannabis flower in oil or alcohol — sprays, oils, and lozenges.
        Letting the product absorb under your tongue rather than subjecting it to the digestive tract preserves more of the CBD, and you’ll feel results faster.
        Sublingual products take effect faster than edible products. Choose this route if you’re looking for quicker results.
        Topicals
        CBD topicals are designed to be applied directly to the skin. You can find CBD-infused lotions, balms, creams, salves, and transdermal patches. Topicals are a great choice when it comes to treating localized pain or skin conditions like eczema in a discreet fashion. A 2015 study done on rats found that CBD gel applied to the skin greatly reduced joint swelling — promising results for people with conditions like arthritis.
        While studies on topicals haven’t given an estimate of bioavailability, we do know a couple of things:
        Topicals aren’t subjected to the first-pass effect, so they’ll provide concentrated relief to a particular area.
        The permeability of your skin is pretty poor relative to mucous membranes, like sublingual tissue. That means when using a topical product, you’ll want to choose one with a high amount of CBD and apply it generously.
        Using a product that contains additional analgesics including menthol, camphor and capsaicin may bring even more therapeutic potential to the mix.
        Vaping and Smoking
        You can smoke high-CBD cannabis flower in a joint, use a vaporizer with a cartridge that contains CBD oil, or even inhale CBD concentrates such as sugar waxes with any vape pen that has a chamber for concentrates.
        Vaping and smoking allow the CBD to go directly into your bloodstream, so you’ll feel effects much faster than you will with other methods. In 10 minutes or less, you’ll absorb 34 to 56 percent of the CBD. Vaped or smoked CBD takes effect in 10 minutes or less, and you’ll absorb about 34 to 56 percent of the CBD you consume. However, vaping may cause other negative health effects.

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